PRESS RELEASE

Five Weeks Remain for Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunity at Presidio’s Iconic Fort Winfield Scott

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

​​​​Concept Proposals for “Campus for Change” due June 29, 2018​​​​

​​​​​​​​Presidio of San Francisc​o (May 29, 2018)​ – Visiona​ries seeking to tackle the significant environmental or social challenges of our time have five weeks remaining to submit big ideas for the redevelopment of Fort Winfield Scott, a 30-acre campus within the Presidio of San Francisco, a national park at the Golden Gate.

In January, the Presidio Trust issued a Request for Concept Proposals (RFCP) seeking one or more mission-driven organizations to reimagine Fort Winfield Scott as a "Campus for Change." Fort Winfield Scott is one of the last large areas of the Presidio to be rehabilitated—the former US Army post has undergone a steady transformation from "post to park" over the past two decades.

Concept proposals are due to the Presidio Trust by 5 pm on June 29, 2018. Proposals are welcome from diverse organizations, individually or in a joint venture/partnership. Proponents must have the financial and management capacity to finance and oversee the rehabilitation of 20 buildings totaling nearly 300,000 square feet of space, and to make infrastructure improvements throughout the campus. Respondents may opt to include two additional buildings totaling 15,000 square feet of space. New construction of up to 20,000 square feet may be considered.

Costs for revitalizing the campus are estimated at $200 million. Because the buildings qualify as certified historic structures, the successful bid may be eligible for the Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives program.

To date, the Trust's Fort Scott website (www.presidio.gov/fortscott) has seen more than 700 downloads of the Request for Concept Proposals. "We're very pleased at the interest we've received thus far and look forward to seeing a variety of concepts to reimagine Fort Winfield Scott for the benefit of all," says Josh Bagley, Director of Real Estate Development for the Presidio Trust. "We urge interested organizations to contact us for a tour to learn more about this opportunity."

The project website includes a Collaborative Opportunities page for organizations who are interested in either submitting a collaborative proposal or becoming tenants.  

 

The Presidio Trust will post proposals received on its website on July 2, 2018. Qualified proposals will be presented by respondents at the July 25, 2018 Presidio Trust public board of directors meeting. The board will then select which, if any, proposals will move to the second step of the process: submitting a full Request for Proposals (RFP).

RFCP Contact: Josh Bagley, (415) 561-5335; fortscott@presidiotrust.gov
The Presidio Trust
103 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94129
www.presidio.gov/fortscott
 
Fort Scott History
Fort Winfield Scott, named for the most prominent U.S. Army officer of the 19th century, was initially established as an independent post for the Coast Artillery Corps. While located within the Presidio Army post, Fort Scott functioned separately with its own commander until after World War II. Over the course of half a century, it served as headquarters for the defense of the Bay Area's coastline, from the era of breech loaded, rifled guns to Nike missiles. Constructed between 1909 and 1912, the Fort Scott barracks feature the earliest example of the Mission Revival architectural style at the Presidio.
 
About the Presidio
The Presidio served as a military installation from its establishment in 1776 as Spain's northern-most outpost of colonial power in the New World, l​ater passing to Mexico and then the United States. In 1972, Congress created one of the world's largest national parks in an urban setting – the Golden Gate National Recreation Area – and declared that the Presidio would be part of the GGNRA  should the military ever leave. At the end of the Cold War in 1989, Congress decided to close the Presidio. Its 218-year tenure as a military post ended in 1994 when the U.S. Army lowered its flag for the last time and the Presidio became one of the nation's parks.

Over the past two decades, the Presidio has undergone an exciting "post to park" transformation. The Presidio Trust, the National Park Service, and the non-profit Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy have rehabilitated hundreds of historic buildings as visitor destinations, homes, and workplaces; restored native habitats; built hiking and biking trails; and created destinations and programs to welcome visitors. Learn more at www.presidio.gov.

Editor's Note: Interviews with project staff and photo assets are available upon request.​