Exclusion Public Programs

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​​​​​​​​​A series of public programs explores exhibition themes more deeply, gives voice to stories not told in the gallery, and relates the exhibition to contemporary ideas. Through different formats—interactive dialogues, stimulating talks, performances, and films—the programs offer audiences many ways of connecting to the exhibition.

The program series is presented as part of the ongoing calendar of events at the Presidio Officers' Club. Admission is free. Registration is required.

See also Community Collaborat​​ors for additional programming offered by exhibition community collaborators.

Upcoming Programs​

November 3: Presidio Sessions - Anthony Brown's Asian American Orchestra
This orchestra blends the sonorities and improvisational approaches of the jazz tradition with Asian musical instruments and sensibilities. The premiere of GO FOR BROKE! honors the Nisei soldiers who fought in World War II while their families were imprisoned.
Register Now >>

November 9: Presidio Dialogues - Isamu Noguchi: Self-Interned, 1942
Through a visually rich presentation, Dakin Hart of New York’s Noguchi Museum describes how multi-cultural artist Isamu Noguchi voluntarily interned himself in Poston War Relocation Center with other Japanese Americans during World War II.
Register Now >>

​​November 11: A Tour of General DeWitt's Office
Join Presidio Trust Historian Barbara Berglund Sokolov and National Park Ranger James Osborne for a rare glimpse into General John DeWitt’s office, where he made the decision to imprison Japanese American citizens and non-citizens without due process. Meet inside the Presidio Officers’ Club at 10 am. We will then take a ten-minute walk to the office site. The walk and the office are accessible.
Saturday, November 11 >>

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Past Programs​

September 15: Presidio Sessions - Farallon Quintet
The Farallon Quintet, founded in the summer of 2012, is a dynamic Bay Area ensemble and the only professional chamber music group focused exclusively on the string quartet plus clarinet repertoire. In addition to playing the classics, the quintet performs rarely heard works, innovative arrangements, and new music by living composers.​

July 8, August 12, and September 9​: A Tour of General DeWitt's Office
Join Presidio Trust Historian Barbara Berglund Sokolov and National Park Ranger James Osborne for a rare glimpse into General John DeWitt’s office, where he made the decision to imprison Japanese American citizens and non-citizens without due process. Meet inside the Presidio Officers’ Club at 10 am. We will then take a ten-minute walk to the office site. The walk and the office are accessible.

April 27: Letters from the Camps: Voices of Dissent
Using original letters from the internment camps of WWII, now preserved at California Historical Society, this interdisciplinary presentation focuses on Japanese Americans who spoke out during and after internment.
Contemporary descendants, writers, historians, activists, and performers will read from the letters and share their responses, including: Karen Korematsu, the Founder and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute and the daughter of the late Fred T. Korematsu, Stan Yogi author of Wherever There's a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California and Fred Korematsu Speaks Up, John Crew, retired ACLU attorney, and Bonnie Akimoto, most recently in the play Beneath the Tall Tree at TheatreFirst in Berkeley.
The readings of excerpts from the letters will be followed by remarks from Karen Korematsu and Jay Hirabayashi, a short discussion moderated by author and former Communications Director for ACLU Northern California, Elaine Elinson, and close with an audience Q&A.
In partnership with the California Historical Society and the American Civil Liberities Union (ACLU) of Northern California.
Deepest thanks to the Friends of Topaz.

April 22: Presidio Book Club
Gary Y. Okihiro, Storied Lives: Japanese American Students and World War II (University of Washington Press, 1999)
During World War II more than 5,500 young Japanese Americans found their way out of the internment camps in which their families were imprisoned to attend colleges beyond the West Coast exclusion zone. This little-known story, of the actions of these Nisei students and the white Americans who helped them, adds an important dimension to understandings of both racism and antiracism on the American homefront.
This four-month Presidio Book Club series (begun in January) explores U.S. wartime homefronts, from a West Coast perspective and through a broader national lens. The Presidio of San Francisco was a U.S. Army post from 1846 to 1994. The people who passed through here shaped conflicts at home and abroad. Through these books we’ll delve into how individuals and communities have grappled with war; how war has propelled social and economic change; and how war has both challenged and confirmed ideas about what it means to be an American.

April 1 and 2: C​reative Family Fun - Origami Animals
Drop in for imaginative craft-making based on the Presidio’s natural and cultural heritage. Featuring different crafts every weekend!
Paper folding, known as origami, is an art form that has been practiced for more than a thousand years. At the Presidio Officers' Club, we will create origami with a Presidio twist. Join us to create animals that live in the Presidio out of paper!

April 1: Perspectives on Japanese American Incarceration
​This panel dialogue marks the opening of the new special exhibition at the Presidio Officers’ Club, Exclusion: The Presidio’s Role in World War II Japanese American Incarceration.​ Exclusion is the latest special exhibition at the Presidio Officers' Club, a cultural institution showcasing the Presidio's role in shaping and serving the nation. Special exhibitions​​ explore the Presidio's heritage and allow for fresh perspectives and a deeper exploration of the topics and themes presented in the club's​ permanent exhibition.
The military, the press, and the law were three institutions central to implementing, understanding, and challenging World War II Japanese American incarceration. Explore these perspectives with Dr. Stephen Payne, Command Historian at the Presidio of Monterey’s Defense Language Institute and Foreign Language Center; Richard Reeves, author of Infamy: The Shocking Story of Japanese American Internment in World War II, journalist, and senior lecturer at University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication; and Don Tamaki, San Francisco civil rights attorney who served on the legal team that reopened the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case of Fred Korematsu, vacating his conviction for refusing to be incarcerated during World War II.
In developing the Exclusion exhibition and its related public and school programming, the Presidio Trust staff collaborated with the Fred T. Korematsu Institute and the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS).

January 19: Of Civil Rights and Wrongs: The Fred Korematsu Story
Experience a screening of the two-time Emmy Award®-winning short documentary, Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story (60 mins), followed by a panel discussion with Karen Korematsu, daughter of Fred Korematsu, and founder and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute. The panel will discuss the film and draw parallels between racial profiling and mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII and people of color t​oday.

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